Creating An Online Writing Portfolio

While in college, graduating, or having had just graduated; it’s still an exceptional idea to take all that you’ve learned and really focus that into a portfolio based off of your experiences. For English majors who, perhaps don’t wish to embed themselves in the field of teaching like stereotypes may suggest, this option of creating a writing portfolio is possibly the best measure to take in order to be recognized.

 

Consider Your Options

Working in the digital age means most possible employers are going through online Résumés to see who’s qualified for the work they need. This does not mean no physical material is required, but it does as well, mean a physical writing portfolio has less of a chance of appealing to said, employers. However, if making one is one of your goals, here are a few pieces of advice. Physical writing portfolios should consist of organized sections of your work throughout the years but be more refined and refreshed. Create categories along with a table of contents to aid potential employers in finding certain aspects of your work they may want to observe. For a professional finished look, always place your writing portfolio inside a binder or something close to it. For the sake of us growing in a digital age, the rest of this article will generate towards online writing portfolios.

 

Create a Folder

The perks of having all your work on a computer is that it’s much easier to maintain and locate. Whatever you believe you need, including your résumé (never forget that); create a folder labeled “writing portfolio” or perhaps another title that will help you remember what it contains, and place all your work inside.

 

Place Your Résumé Online

You always want to advertise yourself as much as possible. The best way to do this is by posting your résumé online to credible websites. One common website great for résumés that allows you to also give explicit details about your skills and allows networks of people you know to highlight your abilities is www.linkedin.com. The key aspect of this website is the provided link it gives you once you’ve finished polishing yourself. This link is great to post to your social media or websites you may be on or have; which leads me to my next and final state of advice.

 

Create a Website

Places like linkedin.com are great, but having your own personal website with descriptions of yourself, your skills, your links to your résumé, and so on, build that professional image employers are searching for. This also gives you a reason to display your own style and creativity. If you have certain categories that your work is divided into, tabs on your website contribute to better organization and simpler access for people who are interested in your work. All of this does not mean you need to go searching for prices of domain names. Though having your own domain name would be admirable, free websites that let you build your own free website with minor considerations, are better options as well. Employers aren’t observing what platform you used for your website, they’re observing your writing talent. Always remember when you’re creating a website, you need an attractive credible homepage and a required contact/about page that gives people safe ways to contact you.

 

There you have it. Now you have fresh, conceivable ways for employers to get to know your style and work without having to constantly keep your physical work in order; but remember, always have a physical writing portfolio available. You never know if your potential employer might ask for it or not.

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